Predicting Ontario’s legal rec cannabis market proves tough for analysts

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.  Simple multiplication by 7 in this example would vastly exaggerate or negate the reality of our circumstances in Canada.

While no one is arguing that the legal cannabis market will be significant in Canada, it is unwise to garner these vast numbers without anything solid backing them up and the Ontario government’s plan to take the market from street dealers could backfire.  As the article states, “the marijuana market in Canada…is expected to behave like every other commodity, with supply, demand and pricing all having an impact, making it difficult to predict the economics of it all amid so many unknowns.  Putting a flood of new supply on the market after legalization could actually drive down the street price as illicit dealers cut prices to compete.”

Read the original article on CBC.ca here for more details

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.” According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the […]

CBC.ca recently posted an interesting article sharing predictions for Ontario’s recreational cannabis market after legalization.  Writer, Mike Crawley opines right off the bat that, “[w]hen you look closely at the projections…you have to wonder what some of the analysts are smoking.”

According to this article, some analysts are setting expectations very high, claiming that the demand for legal cannabis in Canada will amount to an estimated $10 billion by extrapolating from the precedents being set in Colorado.  But some believe these numbers are being inflated as many of the people seeking them have an agenda for promoting the industry.  Furthermore, the Ontario government has remained largely mum about making any statements on the projected value of the legal recreational cannabis market, leaving it wide open to speculation.

So what are the real numbers?  Simply multiplying Colorado’s numbers by 7 to project demand and revenue for our whole country, as some cannabis market analysts do, seems like a flawed strategy running the risk of gross overestimation.  Colorado, as the article states, “was (and largely still is) and island of legal weed in a country where most states continue to criminalize.”  They are raking in high demand and revenues not only from their own citizens but from pot tourism, too, thereby inflating the amounts purchased and consumed by their actual population.   On the flipside for Canada, tourists to Canada are less likely to carry cannabis purchases back home over the border for risk of getting caught so revenues would likely not skyrocket in Canada the same way.